Bear in the Eastern Mediterranean – Is Russia a Pain the Back...

Bear in the Eastern Mediterranean – Is Russia a Pain the Back for U.S?

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The writer explores the changing balance of power between U.S and Russia and its implications on international relations.

The colors on global canvas are ever changing and yet faster than it were a couple of decades ago. I grew up with Iran-Iraq war on national TV and it never seemed to end followed by Soviet Union’s invasion of neighboring Afghanistan.

However, the change has drastically gained momentum and global power players are clearly giving the notion of having less time for thinking – action is far more important! The recent power projection of Russia in the Middle East and how the overall operational convergence takes place in a given time is a clear example of radical change. Having enjoyed total domination over the Syrian skies and Eastern Mediterranean, U.S now clearly feels constrained. The country and its media will never show it on their faces but even a layman analysis of its operational patterns clearly reveals U.S’s reluctance to face Russia’s over bearing presence in the region.

From the Ukraine crisis to intervening in Syria to the bold statements during G-20 Summit and then demonstrating clear support for Turkey after attempted coup (which many consider another false flag), there is more to Russia than just Syria. The step is not just a passing phenomenon but represents a permanent shift in Russia’s geo-strategic placement in the region.

Needless to say, the recent Russian strikes from an Iranian air base add to the question marks. Though the grounds used are much narrow in scope and capacity, yet pointing out a greater specter moving towards the Gulf region as well. For many it is merely a starter on the menu!

All this is not just disturbing the U.S whose dominance remained unchallenged unless Russian machinery started showing up but shapes the decision-making of regional leaders as well. For instance, imagine what is on Saudi King’s mind as a massive alliance for Syria shows up with hands akimbo and has already given a demo of operational effectiveness from Iran. At such a time you see your most trusted ally stepping back from its commitments in the Middle East, striking a deal with Iran and taking a bow as Russia embarks on a military journey in Syria. It would be interesting to see how Saudi Kingdom starts thinking on being more accommodating to Putin’s regional agenda.

Simply withdrawing from the field has many implications. Though intentional withdrawal has been the norm for U.S so far leaving vacuum for interested corporations, this time withdrawal is unfortunately not intentional and the interested party is not a friendly corporate.

While the U.S may not fully understand Russia’s power play or perceive Russia as a major enemy of its time, Russia does. Russia is utterly convinced of the fact that U.S is the only strategic enemy and that both are effectively at war. The outgoing Obama administration may be new to this phenomenon having a history of offensive dominance and unquestionable regime installations, a Russian bear in the skies is of course hard to imagine for the bald eagle.

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